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This can only happen if all agents have a sound understanding of how to recogniseand address barriers to learning, and how to plan for diversity. An important part of the concept is to develop collaborative skills, learn more about what it means to be a consumer and to deepen the students’ media literacy. Aesthetic sensitivity in children is cultivatedthrough the observation and appreciation of the environment and by comparing the formsand patterns of different things. The learners’ progress in learningEnglish englobes increased use of the language and growing ease during its use.8.3 Language Teaching Methodology In Grades 7-9, teachers are encouraged to adopt an inductive approach, whereby learningtakes place through guided-discovery and cooperation with peers, so that learners play a moreactive role in the instructional process and gradually develop more autonomy in the use of thelanguage. • E nsure a smooth transition from pre-primary to primary, and consecutive years at primary level. 4.2: The Three Types of Support 28 Fig. The NYCBE responds to the future that our childrenwill face and provides the means to develop preparedness for the future job market. National Curriculum Framework English; Search ... Go. global awareness, civicskills and innovative thinking skills), as well as to infuse the right attitude and values. Teachers should be aware that assessment, as anintegral part of the teaching and learning process, should help students to: (i) progress through the curriculum, by meeting the expected outcomes; (ii) demonstrate high achievement in the Key Stage 4 of the National Certificate of Education; (iii) make appropriate orientation choices; and (iv) effect a smooth transition to upper secondary. To get a degree online, research on the internet to find an online course in the subject you want to study. Changes in education require the right thinking, the building of a foundation and the abilityto distance ourselves from a model based on reproducing facts and knowledge that haveincreasingly shorter and shorter shelf life. Questions, for example, included: how does the new curriculum affect the school work in practice and what does the curriculum mean for the school? It is thus a powerful tool that children use to adapt to thenew social context which school represents and to acquire the new knowledge and skills speltout in the curriculum. The theme of the sub-working group was either a school subject or related to the transversal competences or value base of the curriculum. Our multilingualism also serves as an important gateway to the globalised economic world. Effective learning andteaching take place when teachers are able to understand how to teach better by looking atmistakes students make, and students learn to grow from their mistakes. Formal Assessment is normally confused with written tests and examinations. We were wary of the latent desire to preserve the status quo, ignoring thefacts and demands of the new era. There is a needto reconsider how teacher’s assessment decision fits in the overall Assessment Programme ofthe school so that the student is not overloaded with assessments at the same time, in particularwhen using a CAS approach. National Curriculum Framework Nine-Year Continuous Basic Education | 47, 8.5 The Place of Literature in the Curriculum Literature is of considerable value to human life. Cross-curricular areas aspresented in the primary curriculum, are a collective term for a variety of themes underthe overarching principle of Education for Sustainable Development that include LifeSkills, Intercultural Education and Sexuality Education. 1 The first curriculum, led by the EDUFI, was created in 1985 after which it was renewed in 1994 and 2004, with the latest work started in 2012. The notion of inclusivityencompasses cultural diversity as well as the development of a sense of belonging to theschool by all children, irrespective of achievement level. • It will make teaching more efficient and provides learners with teaching, learning and assessment adapted to their abilities and knowledge. • Early identification of learning difficulties and exceptional abilities. The primary curriculum is progressive across the years and spiral in nature.Compulsory EducationAGEYEARCURRICULUM STAGES CURRICULA A Nine-Year Continuous and Holistic15 - 16AdditionalSTAGESCurriculum Grades 7 to 912 - 14+ CurriculumYearsOrientation StageCurriculum Grades 1 to 65+ - 11+ Grade 9 Grade 8 Consolidation Stage Grade 7 Foundation Stage Grade 6 Grade 5 Grade 4 Grade 3 Grade 2 Grade 1 Table 1: Stages of the Nine-Year Continuous Curriculum 7, National Curriculum Framework Grades 1 to 6 - Foundation Stage: Grades 1, 2 and 3 The Foundation Stage starts with the Foundation Year, which strives to create a smooth transition from pre-primary to primary. Project-based learning then, means the willingness to act with uncertainty. Accordingly, this curriculum will beimplemented taking into account the diversity of learners and it will provide for the setting upand implementation of an early learning support system in Grades 7 to 9.2.3 Criteria for Curriculum Review and Development Figure 2.2 below describes the criteria used for the review and development of the NYBCEcurriculum. • In cases where learners have unique learning styles and favour tactile and kinaesthetic engagement, concrete real-life examples may be more suited, rather than the abstract methods that make demands on few faculties that the learner has more difficulty to develop. Learning outcomes for each learning area/subjectensure consistency and inform the development of textbooks (print and digital), pupils’ activitybooks, teachers’ guides and other classroom resources. The school principals’ role in creating the settings for the curriculum to start emerging in practice is important. Sarakorpi is of the opinion that the new curriculum challenges every school in Finland to take a new perspective, for example, on the role of the students themselves. Introduction 4 2. (iii) At Lesson Planning Level Often an assumed or neglected aspect of classroom practice, lesson planning should beconsidered by teachers as an opportunity to plan effectively for assessment activities withinthe day-to-day teaching and learning process. The ultimate aim is to ensure that the education system in place allowsfor more students to exit with a better performance at the end of the period of compulsoryeducation, and reach a success rate comparable to that of higher achieving countries aroundthe world. Entering the school yard, the pupils were having their afternoon break and one of the teachers were serving the pupils ice-cream. Assessment provides multiple opportunities to challenge each learner, to enhance her/ his potential, and to achieve and improve as an individual without being in a situation of unhealthy competition.38 | National Curriculum Framework Nine-Year Continuous Basic Education, 7.2.2 Selecting an Assessment Strategy The holistic and student-centred nature of this curriculum must be reflected in the assessmentused by the teacher, the school and also at national level. Professionals from 25 different organisations also provided their views and insights based on their respective expertise.List of Contributors in CONSULTATIVE MEETINGS: Educators and Rectors from: • State Secondary Schools (Mauritius and Rodrigues) • Private Secondary Schools (Mauritius and Rodrigues) • Service Diocésain de l’Education Catholique (SeDEC) • Mahatma Gandhi Secondary Schools and Rabindranath Tagore Secondary SchoolProfessionals from other Institutions, Ministries and Unions:• Aapravasi Ghat Trust Fund Management• External Advisor – National Institute of • Ministry of Gender Equality, Child Education, Singapore Development and Family Welfare• Fashion and Design Institute • Ministry of Ocean Economy, Marine• Food and Agricultural Research and Resources, Fisheries and Shipping Extension Institute • National Heritage Fund• Government Secondary School Teachers’ • National Parks and Conservation Services • Nelson Mandela Centre Union • Non-Governmental Organisation – Terre de• Mahatma Gandhi Institute• Mauritius Examinations Syndicate Paix• Mauritius Institute of Training and • Private Secondary Education Authority • Rajiv Gandhi Science Centre Development • Secondary and Preparatory School Teachers• Mauritius Oceanography Institute• Mauritius Qualifications Authority and Staff Union• Mauritius Research Council • University of Mauritius• Mauritius Standards Bureau • University of Technology, Mauritius• Ministry of Education and Human Resources, Tertiary Education and Scientific Research• Ministry of Environment, Sustainable Development and Disaster and Beach2 | National Curriculum Framework Nine-Year Continuous Basic Education, ContentsPart 1: General Introduction and Orientation 91 The National Curriculum Framework 11 1.1 Background 11 1.1 The National Curriculum Framework 12 1.2 Embracing Change 12 1.2 Continuous Basic Education for All 12 1.3 Overall Goals 13 1.3.1 Specific Objectives 132 Curriculum for Grades 7-9 14 2.1 Curricular Change - A Fundamental Pillar of the NYCBE 14 2.2 NCF Grades 7-9 14 2.2.1 Attention to all Learners 15 2.3 Criteria for Curriculum Review and Development 15 2.4 General Goals of the Curriculum 16 2.5 Desired Outcomes 17 2.6 Curriculum for Grades 7-9 17 2.7 Learning Principles that Inform the Curriculum 17 2.8 Learning Areas and Subjects 18 2.8.1 Learning Areas 18 2.8.2 Subjects in Grades 7-9 18 2.8.3 21st Century Competencies 193 Transition from Grade 6 to 7 20 3.1 The Context 20 3.2 The New Measures 20 3.2.1 Admission to Regular and Extended Cycles 21 3.3 Principles of the Extended Four-Year Cycle 21 3.4 Aims of the Extended Four-Year Cycle 21 3.5 Curriculum for the Extended Four-Year Cycle 22 3.5.1 Differentiated Curriculum 22 3.5.2 Strategies for Differentiation 23 3.5.3 Learning Environment 23 3.5.4 Teaching Methods 23 3.5.5 Curriculum Time 23 3.5.6 Assessment and Progress Rate 24 3.5.7 Content 24 3.5.8 Textbooks and Learning Support Materials 24 3.5.9 Purpose of the Special Class 244 Early Learning Support (ELS) 25 4.1 General Objectives of the Early Support System 25 4.2 Principles of Early Learning Support 26 4.3 Key Players in the Provision of Early Learning Support 26 4.4 Provisions of Support 28 4.4.1 Diversity and Profile of Learners 28 4.4.2 Regular Support 29 4.5 Extended Support 29 4.6 Special Needs Education 29 National Curriculum Framework Nine-Year Continuous Basic Education | 3, 4.7 Differentiation 29 4.8 Remedial Teaching 29 4.9 Structure of the Early Learning Support 30 4.9.1 Pedagogical Assessment of Support Needs 305 School Culture and the Home-School Nexus 32 5.1 A culture of respect 32 5.1.1 Home-School Relationship 33 5.1.2 Engaging Parents 33 5.1.3 The Culture of Inclusive Schooling 33 5.1.4 School Staff and Inclusion 33 5.1.5 Building Support 33 5.1.6 Modes of Accommodation 33 5.1.7 School Culture: A Long-term Goal 346 Pedagogy - Creativity and Innovation 35 6.1 Creativity 35 6.1.1 Schools and Creativity 35 6.2 Pedagogy 36 6.2.1 Innovative Pedagogy 367 Assessment and Evaluation for Grades 7-9 37 7.1 Assessment Principles for Grades 7-9 37 7.2 Assessing in Grades 7-9 38 7.2.1 Outcome-based Assessment 38 7.2.2 Selecting an Assessment Strategy 39 7.2.3 Forms of Formal Assessment 39 7.2.4 Language in Assessment 41 7.3 Planning for Assessment – Making It All Work 42 7.3.1 Levels of Planning 43 7.3.2 Designing the Programme of Assessment 43 7.4 Key Stage 4: Assessment at the end of Grade 9 - National Certificate of Education (NCE) 44 7.5 Ethics in Assessment 44Part 2: The Learning Areas in Grades 7, 8 and 9 458 English 46 8.1 Aims of the English Curriculum 46 8.2 The English Language Curriculum 46 8.3 Language Teaching Methodology 47 8.4 Assessing Language Learning 47 8.5 The Place of Literature in the Curriculum 48 8.5.1 Literature Teaching Methodology 48 8.5.2 Assessment in Literature 48 8.6 Specific Learning Outcomes 49 8.6.1 Grade 7 49 8.6.2 Grade 8 49 8.6.3 Grade 9 494 | National Curriculum Framework Nine-Year Continuous Basic Education, 9 Français 50 9.1 Apprendre le français à Maurice et à Rodrigues 50 9.2 L’enseignement de l’oral 51 9.3 La littérature intégrée à l’enseignement de la langue 51 9.4 Objectifs généraux 51 9.5 Objectifs terminaux 52 9.6 Objectifs spécifiques en termes des 4 compétences et de la littérature 53 9.6.1 Grade 7 53 9.6.2 Grade 8 54 9.6.3 Grade 9 5510 Asian Languages and Arabic 56 10.1 Aims of the Asian Languages and Arabic Curriculum 57 10.1.1 Expected Learning Outcomes for Asian languages and Arabic 57 10.2 Specific Learning Outcomes 58 10.2.1 Grade 7 58 10.2.2 Grade 8 58 10.2.3 Grade 9 59 10.3 Other Features of the Curriculum 60 10.3.1 Communication skills 60 10.3.2 ICT 60 10.3.3 Moral and Cultural Values 60 10.3.4 Literature 6011 Mauritian Kreol 61 11.1 Aims of the Mauritian Kreol Curriculum 61 11.2 Expected Learning Outcomes for Mauritian Kreol 61 11.3 Referansiel Bann Kapasite Par Grad 62 11.3.1 Grad 7 62 11.3.2 Grad 8 63 11.3.3 Grad 9 6312 Mathematics 65 12.1 Introduction 65 12.2 Aims of the Mathematics Curriculum 68 12.3 Expected Learning Outcomes 68 12.4 Specific Learning Outcomes 69 12.4.1 Grade 7 69 12.4.2 Grade 8 70 12.4.3 Grade 9 7013 Science 72 13.1 Aims of the Science Curriculum 73 13.2 Expected Learning Outcomes 74 13.3 Unifying Themes of Science 74 13.3.1 Scientific Inquiry 75 13.3.2 Diversity 75 13.3.3 Models and Systems 75 13.3.4 Interactions 75 13.3.5 Energy 75 13.3.6 Measurement 76 13.3.7 Science, Technology and Society 76 13.4 Development of Inquiry Skills, Processes, Attitudes and Values 76 13.5 Specific Learning Outcomes 77 National Curriculum Framework Nine-Year Continuous Basic Education | 5, 13.5.1 Grade 7 77 13.5.2 Grade 8 79 13.5.3 Grade 9 81 13.6 The Science Curriculum for Basic Education: Standards for Implementation 8314 Social & Modern Studies (SMS) 84 14.1 The Role of Social Sciences in the Curriculum 84 14.2 Organisation of the Social and Modern Studies Curriculum 85 14.3 Components of Social and Modern Studies 85 14.3.1 Interwoven Areas in the SMS curriculum 87 14.4 The Aims of the Social and Modern Studies Curriculum 88 14.5 Development of Skills, Processes, Attitudes and Values through SMS 88 14.5.1 Skills & Processes 88 14.5.2 Values and Attitudes 88 14.5.3 Expected Learning Outcomes 89 14.5.4 Learning through Inquiry 89 14.5.5 The 21st Century Competencies in the SMS curriculum 90 14.5.6 Overview and Content 91 14.6 Specific Learning Outcomes 91 14.6.1 Grade 7 91 14.6.2 Grade 8 92 14.6.3 Grade 9 9215 Business and Entrepreneurship Education (BEE) 93 15.1 Content Areas for BEE 94 15.2 Aims of BEE 95 15.3 Expected Learning Outcomes 95 15.4 Specific Learning Outcomes 95 15.4.1 Grade 7 95 15.4.2 Grade 8 96 15.4.3 Grade 9 9616 Technology Studies 97 16.1 Aims of the Technology Studies Curriculum 97 16.2 Expected Learning Outcomes 97 16.3 Design and Technology 97 16.4 Specific Learning Outcomes 98 16.4.1 Grade 7 98 16.4.2 Grade 8 98 16.4.3 Grade 9 98 16.5 Food and Textile Studies 99 16.6 Aims of Food and Textile Studies Curriculum 100 16.7 Specific Learning Outcomes 101 16.7.1 Grade 7 101 16.7.2 Grade 8 101 16.7.3 Grade 9 10117 Information and Communications Technology 102 17.1 Aims of the ICT Curriculum 102 17.2 Expected Learning Outcomes 103 17.3 Specific Learning Outcomes 103 17.3.1 Grade 7 1036 | National Curriculum Framework Nine-Year Continuous Basic Education, 17.3.2 Grade 8 103 17.3.3 Grade 9 10418 Art and Design 105 18.1 Aims of the Art and Design Curriculum 106 18.2 Expected Learning Outcomes 107 18.3 Specific Learning Outcomes 107 18.3.1 Grade 7 107 18.3.2 Grade 8 107 18.3.3 Grade 9 10819 Performing Arts 109 19.1 Aims of the Performing Arts Curriculum 112 19.2 Expected Learning Outcomes 112 19.3 Specific Learning Outcomes 113 19.3.1 Grade 7 113 19.3.2 Grade 8 115 19.3.3 Grade 9 11720 Physical Education 119 20.1 Aims of the Physical Education curriculum 119 20.2 Expected Learning Outcomes 119 20.3 Specific Learning Outcomes 120 20.3.1 Grade 7 120 20.3.2 Grade 8 120 20.3.3 Grade 9 12021 Life Skills and Values (LSV) 121 21.1 Addressing Life Skills and Values 121 21.2 Intercultural Education 121 21.3 Sexuality Education 121 21.4 Values Education 121 21.5 Social & Emotional Well-being 121 21.6 Road Safety Education 122 21.7 Organisation of the LSV Curriculum 122 21.8 Transacting Life Skills and Values 122 21.9 The 21st Century Competencies and the LSV Curriculum 123 21.10 Aims of the Life Skills and Values curriculum 123 21.11 Expected Learning Outcomes 124 21.12 Specific Learning Outcomes 124 21.12.1 Grade 7 124 21.12.2 Grade 8 124 21.12.3 Grade 9 12422 Curriculum Time Allocation 125 22.1 School Timetabling 125 22.2 Subjects for Grades 7-9 125 22.3 Curriculum Time Allocation: Regular 3-Year Cycle 126 22.4 Curriculum Time Allocation: Extended 4-Year Cycle 127Glossary of Some Terms 129Bibliography 137 National Curriculum Framework Nine-Year Continuous Basic Education | 7, List of Figures and TablesFigures Fig.

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